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the issue of raising the debt ceiling, the amount of money the nation is legally allowed to borrow. ♪ oh, yeah, when it comes to raising the debt ceiling ♪ ♪ the president is having a hard time getting enough ♪ ♪ seems the gop ain't rubbing him the right way ♪ ♪ especially with the country's $16.4 trillion in debt. ♪ ♪ we're still in debt, but it's all right ♪ ♪ the united states really couldn't get any broker ♪ ♪ got to liquidate its assets just like al roker ♪ >> sometimes you feel bad for brian. last week, many criticized the military's decision to allow women to fight in combat roles. jon stewart explains the logic. >> there are certain facts ability upper body streng. 6'4", 240 pound marine and you are injured and you need the marine next to you to carry you back to safety and she weighs 115 pounds. it's irrelevant. we can't have women in combat because they are tiny. they are too delicate. they are little. they are wee little hands. they can barely -- have you ever seen them eat, they pick up a dinner roll. tiny sharp teeth, wait a minute, i'm thinking of
to fight all over again on this and maybe threaten something on the debt ceiling, which for them would be worse. >> one of the things that hasn't changed since the republicans saying these job numbers are terrible. we're going to keep cutting medical they get even worse. >> so in terms of the big battle and any kind of possible grand bargain, you think that's over continuing resolution and budget numbers? >> yeah. well, i mean, the first thing that comes up time-wise, is on march 1st we have to deal with the sequester because the republicans reordered the way that these things are going to fall on the calendar. the sequester is those automatic spending cuts. billions -- tens of billions of dollars just this year in spending cuts. the republicans would like to have some kind of spending cut win this year, and that might be their only opportunity to get one, so you can see them hunkering in and saying, you know, we're going take the hit on defense spending cuts, but we're going to get spending cuts here by hook or by crook, and for democrats they might say, you know, we would rather lose
agreed to that 2011 debt ceiling with that set in motion, more than $500 billion in defense cuttings and whatever. it's the selective mind of everybody, you know, this is -- this is you know, if the defense -- if the -- if the defense cuts are contributing to this, or anything, have you to look at the fact who, agreed to it. it was both parties. >> you are absolutely right. also, i think that -- mr. carney needs to understand that the whole term of sequester emanated out of the white house. and so, we have to start sitting down and saying, look, the direction we are going is not right. what do we need do as far as the personal income tax rate so we can stimulate growth, especially for the small businesses, sub-chapter "s." we saw an incredible selloff in december because people were concerned about the increase in the dividend tax rate. we have to start looking at our regulatory policy. already being we have seen 5,700 pages of new regulations from the federal government. that's going to affect the growth of this economy. we have to get the right type of monetary policy also. >> all
of 2011 and the run-up to the debt ceiling, and in the run-up to the fiscal cliff, excuse me, about a month idago, this idea of $600 billion in new revenue and entitlements. specifically in advance of the fiscal cliff, the white house wanted a change to the benefits formula for social security and basically be a benefit reduction over the long term for social security beneficiaries. is this just another, you know, trip down a dead end road to you or do you think there's movement on a grand bargain in the next month or two? >> i'm glad to be back on the show to qualify "the cycle" skeet shooting tournament. >> you're in. >> check out the stance, howard. >> i want to team up with s.e. of course. >> smart move. >> i called her already. >> okay. this is the -- did you say 47,000th? >> i lost count at 12,000. i'm guessing since then. >> what is whatever you said plus one. there's practically politically speaking no way that the republicans right now are going to go along with anything like that number that you put up on the screen or, frankly, any number right this minute. their mood and
to approve the no budget, no pay act this week as part of the debt ceiling bill. the legislation would require both the house and senate to set a budget by april 15th or members will not get paid. the house passed the measure with bipartisan support last week. i'm joined now by david walker, president of the come back america initiative and cofounder of the no labels movement, which originally proposed the no budget, no pay idea. good to see you. good morning. >> good to be with you. >> so you've pushed this no budget, no pay act since 2011, and now that it could pass this week, explain what you hope to accomplish. >> we hope to accomplish for the first time in four years, where the house, the senate, and the president will all have budgets on the table, which hopefully will facilitate a more honest and full discussion and debate about what do we need to do to put the finances of this country in order, because they're poor and deteriorating. >> do you think that people are surprised to learn that that hasn't happened? >> well, i think a lot of people are surprised to learn that there's
debt ceiling negotiations, anything that washington does that adds to the uncertainty certainly doesn't help the economy. so i think most people would like to see these people sort of get their act together before the deadline, hopefully. >> well, in fact, senator roy blunt just blamed uncertainty. let me play that. >> uncertainty is probably even a greater problem than contraction. if we knew what the government spending was going to be with some certainty, that would be better than this constant not knowing. we're on the 60-day clock and then on the 90-day clock. we need to get on a four and five-year clock. and that's why a budget and appropriations bills will make a difference, chuck. >> what are the chances, michael, of those things happening? >> well, you know, i think a long-term solution doesn't look very practical right now. and one reason is that members of congress like mr. blunt, republicans, are -- i think that it's more important not to give more ground on taxes than it is to create certainty. so i think everyone agrees that uncertainty is a problem. i think basically ev
be fun to use a government shutdown or a debt ceiling crisis to force further cuts. you guys sure know how to show a gal a good time. there's no question over the long term we have to balance budgets and pay down our debts, but short-term deficit hawkishness is hurting us badly right now. our problem is not relief for storm victims or federal money for family planning services, it's a tax base that's too low to support rising health care costs and an aging population over the long term. let's deal with those problems over the long term. but for now, congress, how about we just try to avoid shooting ourselves in the foot. i know blaming government for a lack of spending is not the type of blaming government that the gop usually enjoys, but in lean times it's the only type of blaming government that we can afford. you know what would really be great is some stimulus, but you understand that's probably too much to ask for. so for now let's just keep the government from reversing the private sector-led recovery that is already under way. all right. that does it for us here at the cycle and
vote on the debt ceiling in 30 minutes. what we expect to happen there and what it means for the larger budget bat until d.c. asional have constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues... with three strains of good bacteria. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. behind the silver of philadelphia cream cheese. it always begins with fresh, local milk, blended with real wholesome cream. going fresh from the farm, to our fridge, in just six days. because we believe in fresh taste. that's the way we set the standard for intensely rich, luscious flavor. so our story of fresh taste always ends... deliciously. when it comes to taste, philadelphia sets the standard. >>> in the next hour, the senate is expected to vote on and pass the house's debt ceiling deal. a bill that su spends the debt limit for four months and foregoes the threat of default but doesn't end the fiscal threat. sequestration looms large over the capitol. a provision in the bill being voted on today would whoeld house and
an extension of the debt ceiling, raised the debt ceiling for the future. and i didn't vote for that. there were no cuts included in that bill. the only cut that we have ever come up with is this 1.2 trillion, because the committee, the special select committee couldn't come up with a spending reductions, were now going to have as part as sequestration. i don't really believe in across the board cuts. i think that's irresponsible. but in the absence of cutting spending someplace to replace those 1.2 -- >> got to take it where you get it. >> it's not the only way we're going to get it. >> it's never a good time to cut spending. it's one of the things i've learned. i guess i saw it years ago when i worked down there. but reporting on this thing night after night, one of the things i learned, senator moran, is it's never a good time to cut spending. so march 1st is an interesting deadline. >> i'm not voting to set the sequester aside unless we cut the 1.2 trillion someplace else. >> good luck on that. senator jerry moran of kansas, thank you very much, sir. we appreciate it. >> thank yo
off the debt ceiling fight they'd be able to take control of this issue. >> let's play what mitch mcconnell said just yesterday slamming the democrats for floating new revenue proposals. >> this is just another opportunity to trot out the democrat focus group approved policy stunt. if this is another fake fight designed by the white house to push us to the brink, then republicans are really not interested in playing along. >> molly, another fake fight. as it was described by mitch mcconnell there. but we know when you look at polling and watched since the end of the year, the polls show it's republicans who come up short where people believe they're presenting the fake fight, at least some of the polling. >> well, it is interesting to hear mcconnell describe it as focus group approved. they believe public opinion on their side and if there is what is viewed as gridlock and dysfunction in washington, republicans are blamed by that. i think the white house concluded, looking back on the last four years, that every time republican sort of faint and clutch their pearls about my gosh, he'
't lose those spending cuts. that was to pay for the last debt ceiling increase, let alone any future increases. we're not interested in shutting government down. what happens on march 1, spending goes down automatically. march 27th is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, how to grow the economy, how to create economic opportunity. >> all right. now let's put this in context and think about what congressman ryan from wisconsin is really saying. republicans backed off their debt limit threat because they knew it was a political loser. and now they seem to be backing off their threat to shut down the government. sequester? well, that's another matter. if congress does nothing, the cuts take effect. republicans don't want defense cuts, but they might be willing to stomach those cuts because domestic programs would also get slashed, including medicare. and that's what republicans really want. let's turn to barney frank, former mass
something on sequester or the sky will fall. we have to do something on the debt ceiling or the sky will fall. we have to do something on the continuing resolution or government will shut down and the sky will fall. where do you draw the line? we have a $16 trillion debt in this country. we've got to take a stand. >> howard dean, let me go to you on this because actually you're a tight fisted guy. if i understand it, you want the sequester to go nthrough. $85 billion this year. a little less than 2.5% of the $3.8 trillion budget. if you take out entitlements, then it becomes about a 6%, 7% or 8% cut. what's wrong with that? we're in trouble. doct why can't we do it? >> the sky will fall if you don't deal with the debt ceiling. but i think unfortunately, this is the price that we pay in the fiscal cliff deal. the democrats paid. i said at the time that i thought it was a short term victory for the democrats, but a long term victory for the republicans because we gave away our leverage on tax increases. so, sure, i have no objection to giving away the carried interest on some of the p
the debt ceiling compromise passed the senate. that's a fiscal crisis temporarily averted. it comes just a day after we learn that gdp, that's the mesh shush of how well our economy is performing, contracted by 0.1%. here is how some of the financial media covered it. quote, the best looking contraction in gdp you will ever see. and, quote, don't freak out about gdp. so what's going on here? less government spending happened. primarily in defense. that overshadowed more spending on the part of consumers and businesses, which is what these reporters were actually looking at. for more we go to jared bernstein a senior fellow on the center of budget and policy priorities and jonathan capehart a political opinion writer for "the washington post." welcome to both of you. >> thanks, karen. >> okay, jared. you know i like to come to you with these kinds of things. say what? it's good but it's bad? explain that one to me. >> well, sure. i mean, i already knew we were growing slowly. in fact, i'd say too slowly. i didn't think the economy was actually contracting before yesterday's report for the
, a major funding bill expires. the debt ceiling fight will resurface in the summer. >>> new polls showing the nra's opposition to reforming certain gun laws isn't registering with the american public. according to polling, more than 90% of voters in three states say they support wider background checks for people buying weapons at gun shows. that includes voters who live in households with a gun. when it comes to the question of armed police in schools, more voters in virginia, new jersey, and pennsylvania support the idea than oppose it. the board of education in new it is town, connecticut, is requesting funding for armed police officers in four elementary schools for the next school year. in chicago, meanwhile, mayor rahm emanuel is moving 200 officers from desk duty to the streets amid the city's most violent months in decades. 42 people have been murdered this year including 15-year-old who was shot dead this week while hanging out with friends in a park. >> when any young person in our city is gunned down without reason, their death makes an impression on all of us. and it demands a
the house back no, budget no, pay bill with the current debt ceiling of $64 trillion in mid-may when it is estimated to be $50 million more. the house and senate have to pass budget by mid-april or member paychecks will be held. >> the united states could default on the obligation every few months. not an ideal way to run a government. a short-term solution is better than another imminent manufacturered crisis. >> house republicans passed budget in the obama era and created the salary threat so senate democrats who have not do so this year. >> republicans tried to pass amendments that prioritize payments when cash runs first, pay interest first, social security and active duty military pay. and measure offsetting new debt with the matching spending cut. >> no gimmicks or timing shifts but these would be real cuts and growth in federal spending. >> democrats blocked each amendment. the no budget no, pay act sent unauthorred to the president for promiseed signature. >> the motion carries. >> there is no break in the battle. new deadlines loom. unless the two parties agree on a compromi
the milestones with the debt ceiling and next up sequestration. >> i think that's exactly right. you see that for the gdp numbers, for example. fourth quarter gdp numbers down and in large part because of government spending. redust in the military spending because of the draw down in the war but government spending does help the economy. >> right. >> clear that's been the case looking, for example, at great britain. they're in the double-dip recession right now doing the same austerity measures republicans oppose and we have had 6.1 million new jobs added in this economy and i think that the problems are we have to invest in education, make sure people have opportunities and make sure that the government doesn't pull back right now. >> what we also know is there are republicans who still strongly say and assert that the stimulus did not work and they do not believe in exactly what you just said. >> economists, the majority of those interviewed by "wall street journal" believes the stimulus works. 3 million jobs because of the stimulus and other thing is about the education thing i menti
and the debt ceiling battles? will all of these numbers go out the window? >> well i think the biggest problem this country has is debt. eventually debt has to be paid back and the problem is we adding three billion a day to the deficit, and i'm just worried that one day we're going to wake up and the market's eyes are going to open up and say wait a minute, look at all these debt and start hitting the wrong way. but look. so far so good. for whatever reason the market likes what it sees, and i never argue with the market. it's kind of stupid to do that. i think you would be run over by a train if you bet against it right now. >> heather: gary kaltbaum joining us. thank you so much. we appreciate your insight as always. >> my pleasure. thank you. >> gregg: so he gave us the barney cam. remember that, and he was by president bush's side throughout his eight years in the white house. what the former president is now saying about his beloved scottish terrier. yeah the barney cam. >> heather: hours before the big game, gregg, new developments and allegations involving nfl player ray lewis. >> greg
report. we don't have to deal with the debt ceiling again until august. that's what the treasury department is telling members of congress now. last week house republicans agreed to suspend the limit on how much the feds can borrow until the month of may. but treasury officials say they can take extraordinary measures to move around some money and keep paying the bills a bit longer. in the meantime. the two parties are still going at it over government spending. mike emanuel live on capitol hill tonight. republicans hammering democrats over that growing national debt, mike. >> well, that's right, bill. $16 trillion and counting. republicans say you cannot tax the wealthy enough to make a dent. a leading senate republican says president obama has talked a good game but has not delivered. >> when it comes to reducing the debt as we would say out in the west, the president has been all hat and no cowboy. in other words, he has been all talk and no action. what we have seen over the past four years as trillion-dollar deficits every single year, the debt has ballooned by 50% and so th
, but after the break top republicans m house and senate part way on a key debt ceiling bill. will the intraparty scism end in heartburn or heart break? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable lahtuger). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. >>> the republican party is engaged in a fierce game of tug-of-war with itself. last week after speaker john boehner pleaded with his party to vote for a bill to extend the debt limit for three months, 33 members broke rank. the measure would have failed without democratic support. yesterday the senate took up that same bill and even though
depress the consumer confidence. so has the behavior of washington. we've had the debt ceiling suspended, another budget baths to go through. so investors, businessmen and even individual investors and consumers are still somewhat haunted by what's happening in the nation's capital. >> and if we could put the markets gain back up, we had seen it go above 14,000 earlier this morning. it's -- >> right there. >> right there, right now. okay. so this hasn't happened since '07. >> early october, the all-time high, 14,164. standard & poor's, 1465. we're within striking distance of both. and that's a good sign. the stock market is performing well. the bond market is performing as expected, if the economy is recovering and so are other markets. and the indicators i look atom as, actually quite positive. none showing signs of strain, the future economic prospects better than the past. so for now markets are tell us things are all right. that may change sometime in the future but looks good at this at the moment. >> and ron made fun of my ravens -- >> absolutely. >> see this? ravens-theme note pap
're not worried about the china hard landing. we're not worried about the debt ceiling crisis. we're not worried about, well, for the moment, the eu -- we have that kind of psychological factor. a healthy private sector. and the problem is what? the problem is government and bad policy. and that's what we have to offset. >> but jim iuorio, i want to know where to invest. do we buy gold, silver, and commodities? do we buy banks, which are lagging a little bit? do we buy industrial cyclicals to play the world boom, if there is such a thing? in other words, how do you invest right now, having passed this 14,000 benchmark? >> well, there's a couple things. first of all, when caterpillar released its earnings it talked about good numbers out of housing. and you stloe in china. you invest in things like copper. you know i still like gold and silver. and today with the green light from the fed i'm still going to stay in things like those. i am in bank of america. i am in health care. i think the stock market looks pretty good. you said before, though, the stock market tends to be a leading indicator of
a debt ceiling default crisis. we're not going you have to a government shutdown. yeah, we'll probably have sequester for a few months. but i think these great epic struggles that worried the markets are starting to fade as a strategic policy. >> do you think we veal the sequester? do you think it happens, greg? >> for a while, yeah. i think on march 1 we begin at least on defense and discretionary spending. if there's enough sidewalking maybe by late spring, early sum eshg it gets undone. we'll have that. there's still some headwinds. there's this and the higher payroll tax. maybe first-half growth would be a little slow but i think the storm is sending us a message that by the second half things could be looking much better. >> this week, austin, we moved closer to the automatic across the board spending cuts, the sequester that president obama promised us would never happen. listen a few months ago. >> first of all, the sequester is not something that i propose, it's something congress has po pro-posed. it will not happen. >> i don't know, austin. that could be the one election prom
abandoned. we are not going to have a debt ceiling default crisis and we're not going to have a government shut down. we'll have sequester for a few months, but i think these great epic struggles that worry the markets are starting to fade as a strategic policy. >> do you think it happens, greg? >> for a while, yeah. i think on march 1 we begin at least on defense and discretionary spending. if there's enough squawking maybe by late spring, early summer it gets undone. we'll have that. still some head winds. there is this and the higher payroll tax. maybe first rate growth is a little slow but by the second half, things could be looking much better. >> this week, we moved closer to the unthinkable. the sequester that president obama promised us would never happen. listen just a few months ago. >> first of all, the sequester is not something that i proposed. something that congress has proposed. it will not happen. >> i don't know, that could be the one election promise the president fails to keep. the sequester a part of the decision on march 1st. what happens if the sequester happens? >>
deal on the debt ceiling. then came the fiscal cliff, that was the next chance to prevent all of the cuts. washington punted, they said hey, three more months, we'll solve it then. nope. now three months is coming so guess what? they will punt again. you know what, thinking about it today, it reminded me a lot about this. ♪ put your little hand in mine ♪ put your little hand in mine ♪ put your little hand in mine ♪ there ain't no hill or mountain we can't climb ♪ >> that of course was "groundhog day." at least they had a good song. we have to listen to the terrible voices of people in washington. "outfront," michael waldman from nyu school of law, and michael medved, conservative commentator. great to see both of you. the president asking for a smaller package because a bigger deal can't get done. how is this moving the ball forward? there's blame to go on both sides here but it is pathetic. >> i think he probably would say that it's better to kick the can down the road than to kick the economy off the cliff. this is kind of a self-inflicted answer to a concocted cri
the board cuts part of the deal that was made, the debt ceiling debate of 2011. republicans say it is now time for the president to do something. >> this week, i'm pleased to join my leadership in putting forward the require a plan act that will say to the president two specific things. put a budget in place that balances with a continue-year period of time, but if you don't, tell us when it does. tell us when your plan balances. families and businesses across the great nation must work on a balanced budget. they can't borrow and spend as far as the eye can see. this president, it's time for him to step up, put forward a balanced budget or tell us when his budget will balance. >> for more on what we expect to hear from the president, we want to bring in my colleague and friend, john king in washington. john we know the president will try to kick the can forward here, talk about the need for revenue, as well as spending cuts but not deep cuts that everybody's concerned. what do we expect? >> a familiar haunt for both of us, the white house briefing room. using the power of the presidency t
overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very
followed the house of representatives in the past legislation extending the nation's debt ceiling, this time at least until may 19th. but for practical purposes, probably a few months longer than that. the vote in the senate, 64-34. the bill passed the house next week and will sign it into law. there will be an increase in the nation's debt limit, at least for the next few months. they will battle over this later down the road. other news we're following, three stories involving high-profile shootings at a time when the nation is struggling with the issue of guns. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. some of the other top stories in "the situation room." lisa, what's the latest? >> at least one person has been shot at a middle school in atlanta. the victim was conscious and breathing when taken to a local hospital. the suspected gunman is believed to be a student and is in custody. >>> police outside of dallas are investigating the shooting of a prosecutor. district attorney mark haas was gunned down this morning outside the county courthouse. police aren't sure whether haas was tar
a deal on the fiscal cliff, pushed back the debt ceiling issue so that they can breathe a little bit and try and move away from just these fiscal sues. now on the horizon there are lots of house republicans, particularly younger ones, who say let's cut the defense budget, let those automatic spending cuts take place, and there are lots of senior republicans who say, not so fast. so that's going to be a problem within the republican party as we look ahead. >> where does karl rove and his new super pac fit into that? >> did you ever think republicans would call him a rhino, republican in name only. here you go. i've always thought of karl rove as a conservative. what's going on is his pac has said, you know what, we are tired of someone associated with his pac said to me, quote, the novelty of losing elections has worn off, and what they've decided to do is to start putting their money in primaries. they want to vet republican primary candidates so that by the time they get to the general election they believe they have qualified vetted candidates who can actually win. conservatives ar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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